Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Cell and Chloroplast Division Requires ARTEMIS

Hrvoje Fulgosi, Lars Gerdes, Sabine Westphal, Christel Glockmann and Jürgen Soll
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 99, No. 17 (Aug. 20, 2002), pp. 11501-11506
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3059597
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Cell and Chloroplast Division Requires ARTEMIS
Preview not available

Abstract

Chloroplasts are endosymbiotic organelles of cyanobacterial origin. It seems reasonable to assume that cell division and organelle division still share general principles, as shown for the FtsZ proteins. However, further components involved in this process are largely unknown. Here we describe ARTEMIS, a nuclear-encoded protein of chloroplast inner envelope membranes that is required for organelle division. ARTEMIS consists of three distinct modules: an N-terminal receptor-like region, a centrally positioned glycine-rich stretch containing a nucleoside triphosphate-binding site, and a C-terminal YidC/Oxa1p/Alb3 protein translocase-like domain. Analysis of Arabidopsis En-1 transposon mutants as well as ARTEMIS antisense plants revealed chloroplasts arrested in the late stages of division. Chloroplasts showed clearly separated and distinct multiple thylakoid systems, whereas the final organelle fission remained unaccomplished. Inactivation of a cyanobacterial gene with sequence similarity to the YidC/Oxa1p/Alb3-like domain of ARTEMIS resulted in aberrant cell division, which could be rescued by the Arabidopsis protein. ARTEMIS represents a so-far-unrecognized link between prokaryotic cell fission and chloroplast division.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
11501
    11501
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11502
    11502
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11503
    11503
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11504
    11504
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11505
    11505
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11506
    11506