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Origin of Short-Lived Radionuclides

Sara S. Russell, Matthieu Gounelle and Robert Hutchison
Philosophical Transactions: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
Vol. 359, No. 1787, Origin and Early Evolution of Solid Matter in the Solar System (Oct. 15, 2001), pp. 1991-2004
Published by: Royal Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3066270
Page Count: 14
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Origin of Short-Lived Radionuclides
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Abstract

This paper reviews the evidence for short-lived radionuclides in the early Solar System and critically evaluates models for their origin. Radionuclides with half-lives of less than 50 Myr for which firm and consistent evidence has been found are $^{10}Be,\>^{26}Al, \>^{41}Ca,\>^{53}Mn,\>^{60}Fe,\>^{107}Pd,\>^{129}I$ and 182Hf. The oldest Solar System objects, calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), contained $^{10}Be, \>^{26}Al,\>^{41}Ca$ and 53Mn on formation. We discuss whether a spallation or stellar origin for the radionuclides is more likely, and conclude that the initial presence of short-lived radionuclides in CAIs can be most easily explained if these formed by spallation reactions close to the protosun.

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