Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Light-Adaptive Role of Nitric Oxide in the Outer Retina of Lower Vertebrates: A Brief Review

Mustafa B. A. Djamgoz, Sumathi Sekaran, A. Rita Angotzi, Sakineh Haamedi, Silvana Vallerga, Joe Hirano and Masahiro Yamada
Philosophical Transactions: Biological Sciences
Vol. 355, No. 1401, Sensory Processing of the Aquatic Environment (Sep. 29, 2000), pp. 1199-1203
Published by: Royal Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3066645
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Light-Adaptive Role of Nitric Oxide in the Outer Retina of Lower Vertebrates: A Brief Review
Preview not available

Abstract

The role of nitric oxide (NO) as a novel neurochemical mechanism controlling light adaptation of the outer retina is discussed by considering mainly published results. The emphasis is on the retinae of fishes and amphibia, but some data from the mammalian (rabbit) retinae have also been included for completeness. In the fish retina, application of NO donors in the dark caused light-adaptive photomechanical movements of cones. The normal effect of light adaptation in inducing cone contractions was suppressed by pretreatment of retinae with an NO scavenger. NO donors modulated horizontal cell activity by uncoupling the cells' lateral gap junctional interconnections and enhancing negative feedback to cones, again consistent with a light-adaptive role of NO. Direct evidence for light adaptation-induced release of NO has been obtained in fish (carp) and rabbit retinae. The results strongly suggest that control of retinal light adaptation is under multiple neurochemical control, with NO and dopamine having an interactive role.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1199
    1199
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1200
    1200
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1201
    1201
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1202
    1202
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1203
    1203