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Salmonella Interactions with Host Cells: In vitro to in vivo

B. Brett Finlay and John H. Brumell
Philosophical Transactions: Biological Sciences
Vol. 355, No. 1397, The Activities of Bacterial Pathogens in Vivo (May 29, 2000), pp. 623-631
Published by: Royal Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3066939
Page Count: 9
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Salmonella Interactions with Host Cells: In vitro to in vivo
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Abstract

Salmonellosis (diseases caused by Salmonella species) have several clinical manifestations, ranging from gastroenteritis (food poisoning) to typhoid (enteric) fever and bacteraemia. Salmonella species (especially Salmonella typhimurium) also represent organisms that can be readily used to investigate the complex interplay that occurs between a pathogen and its host, both in vitro and in vivo. The ease with which S. typhimurium can be cultivated and genetically manipulated, in combination with the availability of tissue culture models and animal models, has made S. typhimurium a desirable organism for such studies. In this review, we focus on Salmonella interactions with its host cells, both in tissue culture (in vitro) and in relevant animal models (in vivo), and compare results obtained using these different models. The recent advent of sophisticated imaging and molecular genetic tools has facilitated studying the events that occur in disease, thereby confirming tissue culture results, yet identifying new questions that need to be addressed in relevant disease settings.

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