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Consequences of Life History for Inbreeding Depression and Mating System Evolution in Plants

M. T. Morgan
Proceedings: Biological Sciences
Vol. 268, No. 1478 (Sep. 7, 2001), pp. 1817-1824
Published by: Royal Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3067551
Page Count: 8
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Consequences of Life History for Inbreeding Depression and Mating System Evolution in Plants
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Abstract

Many plants are perennial, but most studies of inbreeding depression and mating system evolution focus on annuals. This paper extends a population genetic model of inbreeding depression due to recessive deleterious mutations to perennials. The model incorporates life history and mating system variation, and multiplicative selection across many genetic loci. In the absence of substantial mitotic mutation, perennials have higher mean fitness and lower, or even negative, inbreeding depression than annuals with the same mating system. As in annuals, self fertilization exposes deleterious recessive mutations to selection, increasing mean fitness and decreasing inbreeding depression. Including mitotic mutation decreases mean fitness while increasing inbreeding depression. Perenniality introduces a kind of selective sieve, such that strongly recessive mutations contribute disproportionately to mean fitness and inbreeding depression. In the presence of high mitotic mutation, this selective sieve may provide a mechanistic basis for high inbreeding depression observed in some long lived perennials. Without substantial mitotic mutation, it is difficult to reconcile genetically based models of inbreeding depression with the empirical generalization that perennials outcross while related annuals self fertilize.

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