Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Conflict between Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Phylogenies of a Recent Species Radiation: What mtDNA Reveals and Conceals about Modes of Speciation in Hawaiian Crickets

Kerry L. Shaw
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 99, No. 25 (Dec. 10, 2002), pp. 16122-16127
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3073918
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Conflict between Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Phylogenies of a Recent Species Radiation: What mtDNA Reveals and Conceals about Modes of Speciation in Hawaiian Crickets
Preview not available

Abstract

It has been asserted that recent mtDNA phylogenies support the plausibility of sympatric speciation, long considered a controversial mechanism of the origin of species. If such inferences are reliable, mtDNA phylogenies should be congruent with phylogenies based on other data. In previous work, a mtDNA phylogeny suggested that diversification of the Hawaiian cricket genus Laupala was initiated by single invasions into each of several Hawaiian islands, followed by multiple sympatric divergences within each island. In contrast, a systematic hypothesis based on morphology argues that speciation in Laupala has occurred primarily in allopatry, with two independent species radiations diversifying across the archipelago. In this study, I analyze nuclear DNA (nDNA) sequences from Laupala to compare with sequences from the mtDNA. The nDNA phylogeny corroborates the hypothesis of allopatric divergence and multiple invasions, and when compared with mtDNA patterns, suggests that interspecific hybridization is a persistent feature of the history of Laupala. The discrepancy between mtDNA and nDNA phylogenies reveals that speciation histories based on mtDNA alone can be extensively misleading.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[16122]
    [16122]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16123
    16123
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16124
    16124
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16125
    16125
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16126
    16126
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16127
    16127