Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Geomicrobiology: How Molecular-Scale Interactions Underpin Biogeochemical Systems

Dianne K. Newman and Jillian F. Banfield
Science
New Series, Vol. 296, No. 5570 (May 10, 2002), pp. 1071-1077
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3076694
Page Count: 7
  • More info
  • Cite this Item
Geomicrobiology: How Molecular-Scale Interactions Underpin Biogeochemical Systems
Preview not available

Abstract

Microorganisms populate every habitable environment on Earth and, through their metabolic activity, affect the chemistry and physical properties of their surroundings. They have done this for billions of years. Over the past decade, genetic, biochemical, and genomic approaches have allowed us to document the diversity of microbial life in geologic systems without cultivation, as well as to begin to elucidate their function. With expansion of culture-independent analyses of microbial communities, it will be possible to quantify gene activity at the species level. Genome-enabled biogeochemical modeling may provide an opportunity to determine how communities function, and how they shape and are shaped by their environments.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1071
    1071
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1072
    1072
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1073
    1073
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1074
    1074
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1075
    1075
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1076
    1076
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1077
    1077