Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Determinism, Realism, and Probability in Evolutionary Theory

Marcel Weber
Philosophy of Science
Vol. 68, No. 3, Supplement: Proceedings of the 2000 Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association. Part I: Contributed Papers (Sep., 2001), pp. S213-S224
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3080947
Page Count: 12
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Determinism, Realism, and Probability in Evolutionary Theory
Preview not available

Abstract

Recent discussion of the statistical character of evolutionary theory has centered around two positions: (1) Determinism combined with the claim that the statistical character is eliminable, a subjective interpretation of probability, and instrumentalism; (2) Indeterminism combined with the claim that the statistical character is ineliminable, a propensity interpretation of probability, and realism. I point out some internal problems in these positions and show that the relationship between determinism, eliminability, realism, and the interpretation of probability is more complex than previously assumed in this debate. Furthermore, I take some initial steps towards a more adequate account of the statistical character of evolutionary theory.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
S213
    S213
  • Thumbnail: Page 
S214
    S214
  • Thumbnail: Page 
S215
    S215
  • Thumbnail: Page 
S216
    S216
  • Thumbnail: Page 
S217
    S217
  • Thumbnail: Page 
S218
    S218
  • Thumbnail: Page 
S219
    S219
  • Thumbnail: Page 
S220
    S220
  • Thumbnail: Page 
S221
    S221
  • Thumbnail: Page 
S222
    S222
  • Thumbnail: Page 
S223
    S223
  • Thumbnail: Page 
S224
    S224