Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Spatio-Temporal Relationships among Adult Raccoons (Procyon Lotor) in Central Mississippi

Michael J. Chamberlain and Bruce D. Leopold
The American Midland Naturalist
Vol. 148, No. 2 (Oct., 2002), pp. 297-308
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3083134
Page Count: 12
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Spatio-Temporal Relationships among Adult Raccoons (Procyon Lotor) in Central Mississippi
Preview not available

Abstract

We monitored 131 (99 male, 32 female) radiocollared raccoons (Procyon Lotor) from January 1991 to December 1997 on the Tallahala Wildlife Management Area, Mississippi. We examined inter- and intrasexual spatial relationships and temporal interactions among adults. Adult males frequently maintained overlapping home ranges and core use areas and some males maintained spatial groups that overlapped minimally with adjacent groups or solitary males, suggesting territoriality among groups. Males arranged in spatial groups were often significantly positively associated with each other; however, we observed instances of males who remained solitary and maintained exclusive home ranges and core areas. Adult females maintained exclusive home ranges and core areas during winter, but several females shared home ranges during other seasons. However, these females did not forage or den together and were significantly negatively associated with each other within shared areas, indicating that movements by these individuals were independent. Home range and core area overlap differed among seasons for males and females with neighboring or overlapping home ranges. Our findings suggest that social behavior in raccoons varies within the same protion of the landscape, ranging from solitary individuals to male social groups.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
297
    297
  • Thumbnail: Page 
298
    298
  • Thumbnail: Page 
299
    299
  • Thumbnail: Page 
300
    300
  • Thumbnail: Page 
301
    301
  • Thumbnail: Page 
302
    302
  • Thumbnail: Page 
303
    303
  • Thumbnail: Page 
304
    304
  • Thumbnail: Page 
305
    305
  • Thumbnail: Page 
306
    306
  • Thumbnail: Page 
307
    307
  • Thumbnail: Page 
308
    308