Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Spatial Organization of Bobcats (Lynx Rufus) in Southern Illinois

Clayton K. Nielsen and Alan Woolf
The American Midland Naturalist
Vol. 146, No. 1 (Jul., 2001), pp. 43-52
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3083151
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Spatial Organization of Bobcats (Lynx Rufus) in Southern Illinois
Preview not available

Abstract

Many aspects of spatial organization in solitary carnivores remain unknown due to prohibitively low sample sizes and reliance on only annual home range and overlap data. We estimated size, overlap and fidelity of annual and seasonal home ranges and core areas of 52 (22 male, 30 female) adult bobcats (Lynx Rufus) in southern Illinois during 1995-1999 and quantified temporal spacing. We report an unusual pattern of spatial organization for bobcats such that, although male and female annual home-range sizes were similar to other regional populations, we found relatively high levels of intrasexual home-range overlap for males and females. Although intrasexual home-range overlap was extensive, core areas were nearly exclusive, implying that core areas confer benefits to bobcats by reducing competition for resources and may represent areas of more aggressive territoriality within the home range. Only 4 of 52 (8%) bobcats shifted annual home ranges, indicating stable spatial organization in the absence of harvest. Home-range size did not differ between seasons and seasonal home-range shifts were minor, suggesting it was either advantageous to be familiar with the same area year-round for maximum exploitation of resources, or that territorial behavior prevented seasonal shifts.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
43
    43
  • Thumbnail: Page 
44
    44
  • Thumbnail: Page 
45
    45
  • Thumbnail: Page 
46
    46
  • Thumbnail: Page 
47
    47
  • Thumbnail: Page 
48
    48
  • Thumbnail: Page 
49
    49
  • Thumbnail: Page 
50
    50
  • Thumbnail: Page 
51
    51
  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52