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Longer-Term Effects of Head Start

Eliana Garces, Duncan Thomas and Janet Currie
The American Economic Review
Vol. 92, No. 4 (Sep., 2002), pp. 999-1012
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3083291
Page Count: 14
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Longer-Term Effects of Head Start
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Abstract

Specially collected data on adults in the Panel Study of Income Dynamics are used to provide evidence on the longer-term effects of Head Start, an early intervention program for poor preschool-age children. Whites who attended Head Start are, relative to their siblings who did not, significantly more likely to complete high school, attend college, and possibly have higher earnings in their early twenties. African-Americans who participated in Head Start are less likely to have been booked or charged with a crime. There is some evidence of positive spillovers from older Head Start children to their younger siblings.

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