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Accessibility and Use of Contraceptives in Vietnam

Nguyen Minh Thang and Dang Nguyen Anh
International Family Planning Perspectives
Vol. 28, No. 4 (Dec., 2002), pp. 214-219
Published by: Guttmacher Institute
DOI: 10.2307/3088224
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3088224
Page Count: 6
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Accessibility and Use of Contraceptives in Vietnam
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Abstract

Context: Accessibility of contraceptives is an important factor in use of family planning. Because contraceptive access in Vietnam varies sizably by region and because one method (the IUD) predominates in Vietnam's contraceptive method mix, a better understanding of the accessibility of family planning services in the country could help program planners increase use. Methods: Data from the 1997 Vietnam Demographic and Health Survey on 5,310 currently married women of reproductive age were used to examine factors related to the accessibility of family planning services. The effects of individual-level and community-level factors were analyzed jointly. Results: Nearly 84% of currently married Vietnamese women-100% of those in urban areas and 80% of those in rural areas-lived within one kilometer of least one source of family planning services in 1997. Commune health clinics and drugstores were the major providers, with 55% and 47%, respectively, of women located within one kilometer of such sources; these were followed by community health and family planning workers (40% and 27%). A multiple regression analysis showed that ready access to any source of family planning significantly reduced nonuse of modern methods (odds ratio, 0.6) and current use of traditional methods (0.6). Likewise, access to a greater number of sources of family planning reduced nonuse of modern methods (0.9) and current use of traditional methods (0.9). Conclusion: Increased availability of contraceptive methods and information could increase use of family planning in Vietnam.

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