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Immigration and Males' Earnings Inequality in the Regions of the United States

Deborah Reed
Demography
Vol. 38, No. 3 (Aug., 2001), pp. 363-373
Published by: Springer on behalf of the Population Association of America
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3088352
Page Count: 11
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Immigration and Males' Earnings Inequality in the Regions of the United States
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Abstract

In this paper I investigate the impact of recent immigration on males' earnings distributions in the major regions of the United States. I use six counterfactual scenarios to describe alternative regional skill distributions and wage structures for the population of natives and long-term immigrants in the absence of recent immigration. I find that immigration over the last three decades can account for a substantial portion of the variation in inequality across the regions. Recent immigration has contributed moderately to national growth in males' earnings inequality, primarily by changing the composition of the population.

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