Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Spread of Woody Exotics into the Forests of a Northeastern Landscape, 1938-1999

John C. Hunter and Jennifer A. Mattice
The Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society
Vol. 129, No. 3 (Jul. - Sep., 2002), pp. 220-227
Published by: Torrey Botanical Society
DOI: 10.2307/3088772
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3088772
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($10.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Spread of Woody Exotics into the Forests of a Northeastern Landscape, 1938-1999
Preview not available

Abstract

This study documents changes in the distribution of non-native woody species from 1938 to 1999 within 30 forests of a $54\>km^2$ landscape in Monroe County, New York. Within these forests, the mean number of exotic species increased nearly three-fold from 1938 to 1999, and two species not naturalized within the landscape in 1938, Lonicera morrowii and Rosa multiflora, had become widespread by 1999. In 1999, the most abundant exotic was Lonicera morrowii, which had greater cover within forests on wetter portions of the landscape where much of the surrounding agricultural land had been abandoned. Though exotics accounted for < 10 % of relative cover within the shrub layer and < 1 % of the tree layer, their cover was higher in portions of some forests, especially near edges. In 1999, six species had covers > 25 % within patches $> 100\>m^2$: Acer platanoides, Crataegus monogyna, Ligustrum vulgare, Lonicera morrowii, Robinia pseudoacacia and Rosa multiflora. These species in particular may represent on-going invasions that could alter this landscape's forested habitats.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
220
    220
  • Thumbnail: Page 
221
    221
  • Thumbnail: Page 
222
    222
  • Thumbnail: Page 
223
    223
  • Thumbnail: Page 
224
    224
  • Thumbnail: Page 
225
    225
  • Thumbnail: Page 
226
    226
  • Thumbnail: Page 
227
    227