Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

School Failure in Early Adolescence and Status Attainment in Middle Adulthood: A Longitudinal Study

Zeng-yin Chen and Howard B. Kaplan
Sociology of Education
Vol. 76, No. 2 (Apr., 2003), pp. 110-127
DOI: 10.2307/3090272
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3090272
Page Count: 18
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
School Failure in Early Adolescence and Status Attainment in Middle Adulthood: A Longitudinal Study
Preview not available

Abstract

Guided by a life-course perspective and using a longitudinal panel data set collected at three developmental stages (early adolescence, young adulthood, and middle adulthood), structural equation analyses specify how early school failure influences status attainment at midlife. The results demonstrate that years of education completed in early adulthood is not the only mediating pathway. Lower levels of mental health and higher rates of deviant behaviors in early adulthood are additional mediating processes. A modest residual direct effect of school failure in adolescence on status attainment at midlife is interpretable in terms of inherited or acquired cognitive abilities and motivational dispositions manifested in early adolescence.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
110
    110
  • Thumbnail: Page 
111
    111
  • Thumbnail: Page 
112
    112
  • Thumbnail: Page 
113
    113
  • Thumbnail: Page 
114
    114
  • Thumbnail: Page 
115
    115
  • Thumbnail: Page 
116
    116
  • Thumbnail: Page 
117
    117
  • Thumbnail: Page 
118
    118
  • Thumbnail: Page 
119
    119
  • Thumbnail: Page 
120
    120
  • Thumbnail: Page 
121
    121
  • Thumbnail: Page 
122
    122
  • Thumbnail: Page 
123
    123
  • Thumbnail: Page 
124
    124
  • Thumbnail: Page 
125
    125
  • Thumbnail: Page 
126
    126
  • Thumbnail: Page 
127
    127