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Induction of Expression of Cell-Surface Homologous Restriction Factor upon Anti-CD3 Stimulation of Human Peripheral Lymphocytes

Dale E. Martin, Leora S. Zalman and Hans J. Müller-Eberhard
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 85, No. 1 (Jan. 1, 1988), pp. 213-217
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/31039
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Induction of Expression of Cell-Surface Homologous Restriction Factor upon Anti-CD3 Stimulation of Human Peripheral Lymphocytes
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Abstract

Homologous restriction factor (HRF) is a 65-kDa membrane protein that inhibits transmembrane channel formation by the membrane-attack complex of complement and by the complement component C9-related cytolytic lymphocyte protein. Stimulation of resting peripheral human lymphocytes with the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody OKT3 has been shown to induce cytotoxicity in the CD8+ subpopulation. As demonstrated here, OKT3 stimulation also induces expression of cell-surface HRF by CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes. The small proportion of Leu 19+ natural killer lymphocytes present in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was found to express HRF prior to stimulation. Whereas unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells were susceptible to lysis by the membrane-attack complex or by the C9-related protein, OKT3-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells were relatively resistant to both the membrane-attack complex and C9-related protein. This acquired resistance was abrogated by blocking surface HRF with F(ab)2 anti-HRF, suggesting that resistance was due to lymphocyte-membrane HRF. By using solid-phase anti-HRF, a 65-kDa protein was isolated from the activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and shown to be capable of conferring upon sheep erythrocytes the characteristic activity of human HRF.

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