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The Robber Baron Concept in American History

Hal Bridges
The Business History Review
Vol. 32, No. 1 (Spring, 1958), pp. 1-13
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3111897
Page Count: 13
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The Robber Baron Concept in American History
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Abstract

The most vehement and persistent controversy in business history has been that waged by the critics and defenders of the "robber baron" concept of the American businessman. Far from being a pedantic exercise, this controversy has at various times exerted a decisive influence on business itself. The origins, spread, and obsolescence of the concept are traced here, together with the merits and failings of currently predominant historical attitudes.

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