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Lionizing Machiavelli

Timothy J. Lukes
The American Political Science Review
Vol. 95, No. 3 (Sep., 2001), pp. 561-575
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3118233
Page Count: 15
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Lionizing Machiavelli
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Abstract

Machiavelli scholarship is prolific but claustrophobic. Even though chapter 18 of The Prince advises the aspiring leader to emulate both lion and fox, commentators ignore or devalue the lion and focus on the fox. Machiavelli is thereby depicted as a champion of cleverness and deception, and not much else. This article takes up the lion. It argues that Machiavelli's lion is not a simple and violent beast, but is rather a complex tutor that complements clinical and lonely foxiness with crucial injections of virility and community.

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