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Permanency of Response to Selection for Quantitative Characters in Finite Populations

C. Clark Cockerham and Hidenori Tachida
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 85, No. 5 (Mar. 1, 1988), pp. 1563-1565
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/31270
Page Count: 3
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Permanency of Response to Selection for Quantitative Characters in Finite Populations
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Abstract

To study the permanency of response to selection for a quantitative character in finite populations and the nature of the genetic effects that contribute to this response, we have used the covariance between ancestors and descendents within populations. Effects and variances are defined for an initial equilibrium random mating monoecious population that gives rise to replicate finite populations. After a prescribed history of restricted population size, the replicate populations are expanded, and the covariance between ancestors and descendents is quantified in terms of descent measures and genetic components in the initial population as a means of determining the additive variance within populations. Several dominance components including joint dominance effects of loci contribute to the additive variance, some of which can be negative. There is always a positive contribution of additive by additive variance to the additive variance within populations, which can be large. With the new definitions of components of genetic variance within populations, selection response is formulated in the same manner as for the initial random mating population, but the components have been modified considerably by the restricted population size.

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