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Domestication Quantitative Trait Loci in Triticum dicoccoides, the Progenitor of Wheat

Junhua Peng, Yefim Ronin, Tzion Fahima, Marion S. Röder, Youchun Li, Eviatar Nevo and Abraham Korol
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 100, No. 5 (Mar. 4, 2003), pp. 2489-2494
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3139555
Page Count: 6
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Domestication Quantitative Trait Loci in Triticum dicoccoides, the Progenitor of Wheat
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Abstract

Wild emmer wheat, Triticum dicoccoides, is the progenitor of modern tetraploid and hexaploid cultivated wheats. Our objective was to map domestication-related quantitative trait loci (QTL) in T. dicoccoides. The studied traits include brittle rachis, heading date, plant height, grain size, yield, and yield components. Our mapping population was derived from a cross between T. dicoccoides and Triticum durum. Approximately 70 domestication QTL effects were detected, nonrandomly distributed among and along chromosomes. Seven domestication syndrome factors were proposed, each affecting 5-11 traits. We showed: (i) clustering and strong effects of some QTLs; (ii) remarkable genomic association of strong domestication-related QTLs with gene-rich regions; and (iii) unexpected predominance of QTL effects in the A genome. The A genome of wheat may have played a more important role than the B genome during domestication evolution. The cryptic beneficial alleles at specific QTLs derived from T. dicoccoides may contribute to wheat and cereal improvement.

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