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Consumer Response to Television Commercials: The Impact of Involvement and Background Music on Brand Attitude Formation

C. Whan Park and S. Mark Young
Journal of Marketing Research
Vol. 23, No. 1 (Feb., 1986), pp. 11-24
DOI: 10.2307/3151772
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3151772
Page Count: 14
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Consumer Response to Television Commercials: The Impact of Involvement and Background Music on Brand Attitude Formation
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Abstract

Past research has examined the effect of level of involvement (high vs. low) on subjects' reactions to persuasive communications. The authors suggest that high involvement can be differentiated into two types (cognitive vs. affective). By manipulating involvement level and type (low involvement, cognitive involvement, affective involvement), they show that the three different forms of involvement have different effects on how brand attitudes are formed. They also examine how music, as a peripheral persuasion cue, affects the process of brand attitude formation. The results indicate that the effect of music on brand attitude depends on the type and level of involvement. Music had a facilitative effect on brand attitude for subjects in the low involvement condition and a distracting effect for those in the cognitive involvement condition; its effect for those in the affective involvement condition was not clear. Alternative explanations of these results are offered and implications for advertising research are discussed.

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