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Brazil's Persistent Income Inequality: Lessons from History

Thomas E. Skidmore
Latin American Politics and Society
Vol. 46, No. 2 (Summer, 2004), pp. 133-150
Published by: Distributed by Wiley on behalf of the Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Miami
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3177177
Page Count: 18
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Brazil's Persistent Income Inequality: Lessons from History
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Abstract

Official data for the last three decades show that Brazil has one of the world's most unequal distributions of income. This article examines the relevant data and then explains the causes of this persistent inequality, considering them also in cultural and historical context. It discusses the politics of continuing inequality and possible strategies for reducing it.

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