Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Icons of Liberty or Objects of Desire? American Women Olympians and the Politics of Consumption

Mark Dyreson
Journal of Contemporary History
Vol. 38, No. 3, Sport and Politics (Jul., 2003), pp. 435-460
Published by: Sage Publications, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3180646
Page Count: 26
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($40.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Icons of Liberty or Objects of Desire? American Women Olympians and the Politics of Consumption
Preview not available

Abstract

The 1920s witnessed both an explosion in sporting opportunities and the first exercise of national suffrage for women in the USA. Some commentators, including several women athletes, claimed that women's incursions into the formerly male domains of highly-competitive athletics were even more important than their hard-fought victory which won them the right to vote. Female athletes were hailed as symbols of the 'new woman's' political and social liberties. For the first time in American history, women's athletic performances became part of the struggle to define national identity in international sporting arenas. At the same time the media treated women athletes as sexually-appealing commodities and marketed them to mass audiences. In the burgeoning American consumer culture of the early twentieth century, female athletic stars served paradoxically as emblems of new political freedoms and traditional objects of male desires.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[435]
    [435]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
436
    436
  • Thumbnail: Page 
437
    437
  • Thumbnail: Page 
438
    438
  • Thumbnail: Page 
439
    439
  • Thumbnail: Page 
440
    440
  • Thumbnail: Page 
441
    441
  • Thumbnail: Page 
442
    442
  • Thumbnail: Page 
443
    443
  • Thumbnail: Page 
444
    444
  • Thumbnail: Page 
445
    445
  • Thumbnail: Page 
446
    446
  • Thumbnail: Page 
447
    447
  • Thumbnail: Page 
448
    448
  • Thumbnail: Page 
449
    449
  • Thumbnail: Page 
450
    450
  • Thumbnail: Page 
451
    451
  • Thumbnail: Page 
452
    452
  • Thumbnail: Page 
453
    453
  • Thumbnail: Page 
454
    454
  • Thumbnail: Page 
455
    455
  • Thumbnail: Page 
456
    456
  • Thumbnail: Page 
457
    457
  • Thumbnail: Page 
458
    458
  • Thumbnail: Page 
459
    459
  • Thumbnail: Page 
460
    460