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Hitler and the Uniqueness of Nazism

Ian Kershaw
Journal of Contemporary History
Vol. 39, No. 2, Understanding Nazi Germany (Apr., 2004), pp. 239-254
Published by: Sage Publications, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3180723
Page Count: 16
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Hitler and the Uniqueness of Nazism
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Abstract

Though nazism can be located as a form of fascism or type of totalitarianism, these generic concepts inadequately account for what was singular about a regime which unleashed such devastating inhumanity - a terrible war of annihilation and the worst genocide the world has yet experienced. So this article suggests an answer located in a unique combination of forces embodied in Hitler's dictatorship: the extraordinary power of 'charismatic authority', drawing on distinctive ideological traits in German political culture, coupled with the bureaucratic capacity of a highly modern state system.

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