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Collective Self-Esteem and Africultural Coping Styles in African American Adolescents

Madonna G. Constantine, Peter C. Donnelly and Linda James Myers
Journal of Black Studies
Vol. 32, No. 6 (Jul., 2002), pp. 698-710
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3180970
Page Count: 13
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Collective Self-Esteem and Africultural Coping Styles in African American Adolescents
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Abstract

The authors examine the relationships between dimensions of collective self-esteem and Africultural coping styles in a sample of African American adolescents. They found that African American adolescents with higher public collective self-esteem (i.e., the belief that others feel positively about their cultural group) reported greater use of spiritual-centered Africultural coping styles to deal with stressful situations. Results also revealed that higher importance to identity collective self-esteem (i.e., the belief that their cultural group is an important part of their self-concept) was related to greater use of collective coping strategies among African American adolescents.

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