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Attacking Iraq

Mark Strauss
Foreign Policy
No. 129 (Mar. - Apr., 2002), pp. 14-19
DOI: 10.2307/3183385
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3183385
Page Count: 6
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Attacking Iraq
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Abstract

As the U.S. military campaign in Afghanistan winds down, should Iraq become "phase two" in the war against global terrorism? Iraq hawks warn that Saddam Hussein's arsenal of mass destruction and his fanatic hatred of the United States make him a paramount threat. Others counsel for continued diplomacy and the return of U.N. weapons inspectors, arguing that an attack on Iraq would destabilize the Arab world. To support their cases, both sides deploy cherished assumptions about everything from Saddam Hussein's sanity to the explosive volatility of the "Arab Street." But a skeptical look at the sound bites suggests that the greatest risk of attacking Iraq may not be a vengeful Saddam or a destabilized Middle East but the unraveling of the global coalition against terrorism.

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