Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

[Introduction]

Foreign Policy
No. 139 (Nov. - Dec., 2003), pp. 32-33
DOI: 10.2307/3183729
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3183729
Page Count: 2
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($17.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Preview not available
Preview not available

Abstract

Disarray in post-Saddam Iraq offers a sharp reminder that ridding a country of a despotic regime is much easier than figuring out who or what comes after. What economic, social, and political forces will shape the futures of other oppressed nations once their dictators fall?

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
32
    32
  • Thumbnail: Page 
33
    33