If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Critical Race Theory and Ethnographies Challenging the Stereotypes: Latino Families, Schooling, Resilience and Resistance

Sofia Villenas and Donna Deyhle
Curriculum Inquiry
Vol. 29, No. 4 (Winter, 1999), pp. 413-445
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3185923
Page Count: 33
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Critical Race Theory and Ethnographies Challenging the Stereotypes: Latino Families, Schooling, Resilience and Resistance
Preview not available

Abstract

In this article, Villenas and Deyhle use the lens of Critical Race Theory (CRT) to examine Latino schooling and family education as portrayed in seven recent ethnographic studies. They argue that CRT provides a powerful tool to understand how the subordination and marginalization of people of color is created and maintained in the United States. The ethnographic studies of Latino education are filled with the stories and voices of Latino parents and youth. These stories and voices are the rich data by which a CRT lens can unveil and explain how and why "raced" children are overwhelmingly the recipients of low teacher expectations and are consequently tracked, placed in low-level classes and receive "dull and boring" curriculum. The voices of Latino parents reveal how despite the school rhetoric of parent involvement, parents are really "kept out" of schools by the negative ways in which they are treated, by insensitive bureaucratic requirements, and by the ways in which school-conceived parent involvement programs disregard Latino knowledge and cultural bases. Together these studies offer an insight into the schooling success and failure of Latino/a students within the context of the social construction of Latino/Mexicano as Other, played out in the anti-immigrant, xenophobic ambience of this country. Yet these studies also give powerful testimony to the cultural strengths and assets of Latino family education as a base by which new ways of schooling can be conceived. It is in fact when communities act as a collective, firmly rooted in their own language and culture, and gain economic and political power that families are able to make concrete changes.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[413]
    [413]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
414
    414
  • Thumbnail: Page 
415
    415
  • Thumbnail: Page 
416
    416
  • Thumbnail: Page 
417
    417
  • Thumbnail: Page 
418
    418
  • Thumbnail: Page 
419
    419
  • Thumbnail: Page 
420
    420
  • Thumbnail: Page 
421
    421
  • Thumbnail: Page 
422
    422
  • Thumbnail: Page 
423
    423
  • Thumbnail: Page 
424
    424
  • Thumbnail: Page 
425
    425
  • Thumbnail: Page 
426
    426
  • Thumbnail: Page 
427
    427
  • Thumbnail: Page 
428
    428
  • Thumbnail: Page 
429
    429
  • Thumbnail: Page 
430
    430
  • Thumbnail: Page 
431
    431
  • Thumbnail: Page 
432
    432
  • Thumbnail: Page 
433
    433
  • Thumbnail: Page 
434
    434
  • Thumbnail: Page 
435
    435
  • Thumbnail: Page 
436
    436
  • Thumbnail: Page 
437
    437
  • Thumbnail: Page 
438
    438
  • Thumbnail: Page 
439
    439
  • Thumbnail: Page 
440
    440
  • Thumbnail: Page 
441
    441
  • Thumbnail: Page 
442
    442
  • Thumbnail: Page 
443
    443
  • Thumbnail: Page 
444
    444
  • Thumbnail: Page 
445
    445