Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Molecular Basis of the Recognition of Intravenously Transplanted Hemopoietic Cells by Bone Marrow

Shin Aizawa and Mehdi Tavassoli
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 85, No. 9 (May 1, 1988), pp. 3180-3183
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/31968
Page Count: 4
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Molecular Basis of the Recognition of Intravenously Transplanted Hemopoietic Cells by Bone Marrow
Preview not available

Abstract

Bone marrow transplantation is done by introducing a source of hemopoietic stem cells into general circulation in anticipation of their recognition and selective lodging into the bone marrow. We tested the hypothesis that the molecular basis of this recognition is by means of a lectin--carbohydrate interaction. We synthesized a number of neoglycoproteins by covalently binding pyranose derivatives of various monosaccharides to bovine serum albumin (BSA). These reagents and the galactosyl-terminating glycoprotein asialofetuin were used to inhibit engraftment of intravenously transplanted marrow cells into lethally irradiated mice. In splenectomized mice, in whom engraftment occurs only in the bone marrow, galactosyl-BSA, mannosyl-BSA, and asialofetuin but not fucosyl-BSA inhibited homing of transplanted cells. Both the survival and cellular content of marrow, including hemopoietic stem cells and granulocyte-macrophage progenitors, were reduced. In nonsplenectomized mice, in whom engraftment occurs in both spleen and marrow, the reagents did not inhibit splenic homing. Both the survival and cellular content of spleen, including hemopoietic stem cells and granulocyte-macrophage progenitors, were similar to those of the control group. But even in this group, marrow homing of transplanted cells was inhibited by these reagents. We conclude that the recognition and homing of intravenously transplanted hemopoietic cells by marrow, but not by spleen, occurs by means of a recognition system with galactosyl and mannosyl specificities.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
3180
    3180
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3181
    3181
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3182
    3182
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3183
    3183