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Oceanic Amoebae from the North Atlantic: Culture, Distribution, and Taxonomy

Paul G. Davis, David A. Caron and John McN. Sieburth
Transactions of the American Microscopical Society
Vol. 97, No. 1 (Jan., 1978), pp. 73-88
Published by: Wiley on behalf of American Microscopical Society
DOI: 10.2307/3225685
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3225685
Page Count: 16
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Oceanic Amoebae from the North Atlantic: Culture, Distribution, and Taxonomy
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Abstract

Amoebae were cultured from 43 to 49 samples taken from 19 stations in North Atlantic waters: four samples from Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island; 20 samples between Rhode Island and Spain (R/V Trident cruise 170); and 25 samples from the open ocean waters of the Strails of Florida (R/V Gilliss cruise 7603). Both surface microlayers and subsurface samples were obtained. Particulate matter was concentrated and dilutions cultured in artificial sea water with OZR agar plugs. An average of 33.6 amoebae/liter were found in the surface microlayer samples (equal to 1,413 organisms/liter, assuming their association with a 5 µm-thick surface layer and a 70% collection efficiency), while subsurface water contained an average population of 1,4 organisms/liter, to a depth of 3,090 meters. The surface microlayer had a higher number of species isolated per sample than subsurface samples. Clydonella, Acanthamoeba, and Platyamoeba were the most frequently encountered genera in both oceanic samplings. Narragansett Bay samples showed a greater diversity of species than those from the Straits of Florida and trans-Atlantic stations. For the surface microlayer samples from all three sample sets, there were no significant differences in the numbers of amoebae/ liter. However, the subsurface values for the trans-Atlantic samples were significantly lower than those for either the Straits of Florida or Narragansett Bay. There was an inverse relationship between numbers of amoebae and dissolved oxygen in subsurface samples, and a positive correlation of amoebae with particulate ATP in the surface microlayer.

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