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Mytilophilus pacificae n. g., n. sp.: A New Mytilid Endocommensal Ciliate (Scuticociliatida)

Gregory A. Antipa and John Dolan
Transactions of the American Microscopical Society
Vol. 104, No. 4 (Oct., 1985), pp. 360-368
Published by: Wiley on behalf of American Microscopical Society
DOI: 10.2307/3226489
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3226489
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Mytilophilus pacificae n. g., n. sp.: A New Mytilid Endocommensal Ciliate (Scuticociliatida)
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Abstract

Mytilophilus pacificae n. g., n. sp. is described as an endocommensal scuticociliate found on the foot and mantle of the Pacific coastal mussel Mytilus californianus. M. pacificae is distinctive in its buccal apparatus which, while pleuronematine in organization, is dominated by the third membranelle. The third membranelle is a characteristic of the genus and distinguishes M. pacificae from other pleuronematine scuticociliates. The general size, body form, dense ciliation, and nuclear configuration are reminiscent of Peniculistoma mytili, which probably occupies a similar ecological niche in the bay mussel Mytilus edulis. Based on the strong correlation of characters of general morphology, buccal structure and habitat with P. mytili, M. pacificae is placed within the Family Peniculistomatidae. The close correspondence between these two organisms and their respective host species suggests that investigation of possible Mytilophilus-Peniculistoma-host interrelationships may provide instructive data for our understanding of speciation events and ciliate evolution.

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