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Deepest Atlantic Molluscs: Hadal Limpets (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Cocculiniformia) from the Northern Boundary of the Caribbean Plate

José H. Leal and M. G. Harasewych
Invertebrate Biology
Vol. 118, No. 2 (Spring, 1999), pp. 116-136
Published by: Wiley on behalf of American Microscopical Society
DOI: 10.2307/3227054
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3227054
Page Count: 21
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Deepest Atlantic Molluscs: Hadal Limpets (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Cocculiniformia) from the Northern Boundary of the Caribbean Plate
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Abstract

Descriptions and scanning electron micrographs of the shell, protoconch, radula, and gross external anatomy are provided for four species of cocculiniform limpets collected from hadal depths of the Cayman and Puerto Rico trenches. Of these, one represents a new genus and species, Macleaniella moskalevi (Cocculinidae), endemic to the Puerto Rico Trench. Another, Amphiplica plutonica (Pseudococculinidae), represents a new species from the Cayman Trench of a globally distributed abyssal genus. The original descriptions of the remaining two species, Fedikovella caymanensis (Cocculinidae) and Caymanabyssia spina (Pseudococculinidae), both from the Cayman Trench and type species of their respective genera, contained only poorly reproduced illustrations of portions of the shells, and line drawings of isolated rows of radular teeth. These four species, each apparently endemic to their respective trenches, represent the deepest records of molluscs collected in the Atlantic Ocean.

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