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Fossil Onychophorans from Dominican and Baltic Amber: Tertiapatus dominicanus n.g., n.sp. (Tertiapatidae n. fam.) and Succinipatopsis balticus n.g., n.sp. (Succinipatopsidae n. fam.) with a Proposed Classification of the Subphylum Onychophora

George Poinar, Jr.
Invertebrate Biology
Vol. 119, No. 1 (Winter, 2000), pp. 104-109
Published by: Wiley on behalf of American Microscopical Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3227105
Page Count: 6
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Fossil Onychophorans from Dominican and Baltic Amber: Tertiapatus dominicanus n.g., n.sp. (Tertiapatidae n. fam.) and Succinipatopsis balticus n.g., n.sp. (Succinipatopsidae n. fam.) with a Proposed Classification of the Subphylum Onychophora
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Abstract

Tertiapatus dominicanus n. g., n. sp. (Tertiapatidae n.fam.) and Succinipatopsis balticus n.gen., n.sp. (Succinipatopsidae n.fam.) (Lobopodia: Onychophora), the first Tertiary fossils of the Lobopodia, are described from Dominican and Baltic amber, respectively. Both families are characterized by the presence of simple legs lacking foot portions with claws and pads. Tertiapatidae is further characterized by soluble body pigments and oral papillae shorter than the legs. Succinipatopsidae is characterized by non-soluble body pigments and oral papillae longer than the legs. Nomenclatural changes include the erection of the class Udeonychophora n.nom. for terrestrial onychophorans with a ventral mouth, the order Ontonychophora n.nom. for extant onychophorans possessing legs with a differentiated "foot" portion, and the family Helenodoridae n.nom. for the genus Helenodora from the Carboniferous. The biogeographical significance of these fossils and their phylogenetic relationship with previously described onychophorans are discussed.

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