Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

An Inverted Paradigm: A Reply to Elisabeth Gidengil

Paul Kellogg
Canadian Journal of Political Science / Revue canadienne de science politique
Vol. 24, No. 1 (Mar., 1991), pp. 135-147
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3229635
Page Count: 13
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($10.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
An Inverted Paradigm: A Reply to Elisabeth Gidengil
Preview not available

Abstract

Through a critique of the "internationalist" arguments outlined and defended by Paul Kellogg, Elisabeth Gidengil has mounted a defence of dependency theory as it has been applied to Canadian political economy. She argues that dependency theory, far from being discarded as Kellogg has suggested, must be part of any new synthesis that is developed in Canadian political economy. She argues that Bukharin's Marxism, defended by Kellogg, is too abstract to be of any real guide in this new synthesis. This reply first situates where a "Bukharinist" approach is in agreement with dependency theory. Both recognize the existence of a rigid hierarchy of nations that impedes development in the Third World. But in Canada, it is argued, this insight has been stood on its head, Canada being theorized as "dependent" and suffering dependency-induced "structural weaknesses." A selection of empirical examples is introduced to indicate the weak factual ground on which this claim is based. If there are aspects of the dependency paradigm to be retained, in the Canadian case this requires inverting the way in which this paradigm has usually been applied and insisting on Canada's entrenched position, alongside the other G7 powers, at the top of the hierarchy of nations in the world system. /// Par une critique des arguments << internationalistes >> forgés et soutenus Paul Kellogg, Elisabeth Gidengil s'est portée à la défense de la théorie de la dépendance telle qu'on l'a appliquée à l'économie politique canadienne. Elle maintient que la théorie de la dépendance, loin d'être dépassée comme Kellogg l'a suggéré, doit faire partie de toute nouvelle synthèse en économie politique canadienne. Elle affirme que le marxisme de Boukharine, défendu par Kellogg, est trop abstrait pour trouver une place utile dans cette nouvelle synthèse. Dans cette réplique, il est d'abord montré dans quelle mesure l'approche << boukhariniste >> est en accord avec la théorie de la dépendance. Les deux théories reconnaissent l'existence d'une hiérarchie rigide des nations qui empêche le développement dans le Tiers-Monde. Mais au Canada, on a renversé l'argument, puisqu'on a posé en théorie que le Canada était << dépendant >> et souffrait de << faiblesses structurelles >> provoquées par la dépendance. En fait, une sélection d'exemples empiriques montre la faiblesse de cette assertion. Si des éléments du paradigme de la dépendance doivent être retenus, cela implique, dans le cas du Canada, une inversion de la façon dont ce paradigme a été appliqué, et une insistance sur la position particulière de ce pays, parmi les sept Grands, au sommet de la hiérarchie des nations dans le système mondial.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[135]
    [135]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
136
    136
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[137]
    [137]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
138
    138
  • Thumbnail: Page 
139
    139
  • Thumbnail: Page 
140
    140
  • Thumbnail: Page 
141
    141
  • Thumbnail: Page 
142
    142
  • Thumbnail: Page 
143
    143
  • Thumbnail: Page 
144
    144
  • Thumbnail: Page 
145
    145
  • Thumbnail: Page 
146
    146
  • Thumbnail: Page 
147
    147