Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Issue Ownership by Canadian Political Parties 1953-2001

Éric Bélanger
Canadian Journal of Political Science / Revue canadienne de science politique
Vol. 36, No. 3 (Jul. - Aug., 2003), pp. 539-558
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3233083
Page Count: 20
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($10.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Issue Ownership by Canadian Political Parties 1953-2001
Preview not available

Abstract

Issue ownership refers to political parties' recognized capacity or reputation to deal competently with a number of issues and problems. Canadian perceptions of party competence in five issue areas are examined: unemployment, inflation, national unity, public finance management and international affairs. Using aggregate-level Gallup poll data from a 50-year period, the study shows not only that Canadians distinguish between federal parties based on their issue-handling capabilities, but also that party images are not impervious to change. Two particular moments of realignment in party images are identified: the beginning of the 1960s, and the early 1990s. The image of the federal Liberal party clearly benefited from both periods. Beyond the expected projection effect of party popularity, two factors are shown to account at least partially for these variations over time in issue ownership. The parties' performance while in office and the arrival of new competitors within the party system in the 1993 election are both found to significantly affect perceptions of party competence in Canada. /// Le concept de << possession d'enjeu >> réfère à la réputation de compétence qu'ont les partis politiques à s'occuper d'enjeux ou de problèmes particuliers. Cet article examine les perceptions qu'ont les Canadiens de la compétence des principaux partis politiques fédéraux concernant les cinq enjeux suivants: le chômage, l'inflation, l'unité nationale, la gestion des finances publiques et les affaires internationales. Les données de sondages Gallup sur une période de 50 ans démontrent que les Canadiens distinguent clairement la compétence des partis sur ces enjeux, mais que l'image de réputation des partis n'est pas immuable dans le temps. Deux périodes de réalignement des images des partis sont identifiées: le début des années 1960 et le début de la décennie 1990. La réputation de compétence du Parti libéral du Canada a grandement bénéficié de ces deux périodes. Il est empiriquement démontré qu'au-delà de la simple popularité des partis, deux facteurs permettent d'expliquer au moins en partie le mouvement dans les perceptions de compétence des partis. Il s'agit de la performance des partis lorsqu'ils sont au pouvoir et de l'arrivée de nouveaux compétiteurs dans le système partisan à l'élection de 1993.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[539]
    [539]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
540
    540
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[541]
    [541]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
542
    542
  • Thumbnail: Page 
543
    543
  • Thumbnail: Page 
544
    544
  • Thumbnail: Page 
545
    545
  • Thumbnail: Page 
546
    546
  • Thumbnail: Page 
547
    547
  • Thumbnail: Page 
548
    548
  • Thumbnail: Page 
549
    549
  • Thumbnail: Page 
550
    550
  • Thumbnail: Page 
551
    551
  • Thumbnail: Page 
552
    552
  • Thumbnail: Page 
553
    553
  • Thumbnail: Page 
554
    554
  • Thumbnail: Page 
555
    555
  • Thumbnail: Page 
556
    556
  • Thumbnail: Page 
557
    557
  • Thumbnail: Page 
558
    558