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The Influence of Environmental Factors on the Spatial Distribution of Saxicolous Lichens in a Norwegian Coastal Community

Torbjørg Bjelland
Journal of Vegetation Science
Vol. 14, No. 4 (Aug., 2003), pp. 525-534
Published by: Wiley
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3236827
Page Count: 10
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The Influence of Environmental Factors on the Spatial Distribution of Saxicolous Lichens in a Norwegian Coastal Community
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Abstract

The effects of vegetation cover, radiation, microhabitat variables and maritime influence on the floristic composition of a saxicolous community in Vingen, western Norway were studied. Particular emphasis is put on the local distribution of Fuscidea cyathoides, Ochrolechia tartarea, Ophioparma ventosa and Pertusaria corallina. Very little of the variation in the lichen community composition is directly related to measured micro-environmental variables but variance partitioning shows that vegetation cover explains more of the floristic variation than radiation, maritime influence and microhabitat variables. Logistic regression analyses nevertheless indicate that the micro-environment influences the spatial distribution of the four species. The high fraction of unexplained floristic variation, 91%, is suggested to result from (1) lack of fit of data to the response model; (2) some influential environmental variables that have not been recorded; (3) local historical factors that affect present day distribution and/or (4) apparent randomness in colonization. The results also agree with the view that the four lichen species in this study are able to co-exist in the long-term because of different spatial distributions resulting from different strategies with respect to ecology, dispersion and interaction.

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