Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Antibiotic Activity of Bryophytes

R. D. Banerjee and S. P. Sen
The Bryologist
Vol. 82, No. 2 (Summer, 1979), pp. 141-153
DOI: 10.2307/3242073
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3242073
Page Count: 13
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($10.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Antibiotic Activity of Bryophytes
Preview not available

Abstract

This study is concerned with an examination of the antibiotic activity of 52 species (in 40 genera) of the bryophytes. The plants were extracted in water, methanol, ethanol, ether and acetone and tested against 12 microorganisms, including 3 Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus, a penicillin-sensitive and penicillin-resistant strain, Sarcina lutea and Bacillus subtilis), 5 Gram negative (Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Vibrio cholerae, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa), one acid-fast bacterium (Mycobacterium phlei) and 3 fungi (Curvularia lunata, Aspergillus niger and Helminthosporium oryzae). Solubility data and antibiotic spectra of the active plants indicate the occurrence of a variety of antibiotic substances among bryophytes. Out of 52 species of bryophytes, 29 (56%) were active against at least one of the test bacteria, but none possessed any antifungal property. The occurrence of antibiotic substances seems to be more frequent in hepatics than in mosses and anthocerotopsids. Antibiotic activity was particularly prominent in the Rebouliaceae, where all 5 species tested were active. The moss Brachythecium procumbens and the liverworts Asterella sanguinea and Marchantia paleacea showed the broadest spectrum of antibiotic activity. Among the test organisms used Salmonella typhi was found to be most sensitive.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[141]
    [141]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
142
    142
  • Thumbnail: Page 
143
    143
  • Thumbnail: Page 
144
    144
  • Thumbnail: Page 
145
    145
  • Thumbnail: Page 
146
    146
  • Thumbnail: Page 
147
    147
  • Thumbnail: Page 
148
    148
  • Thumbnail: Page 
149
    149
  • Thumbnail: Page 
150
    150
  • Thumbnail: Page 
151
    151
  • Thumbnail: Page 
152
    152
  • Thumbnail: Page 
153
    153