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Journal Article

Growth Patterns in Ramalina menziesii in California: Coastal vs. Inland Populations

V. L. Boucher and T. H. Nash III
The Bryologist
Vol. 93, No. 3 (Autumn, 1990), pp. 295-302
DOI: 10.2307/3243516
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3243516
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Growth Patterns in Ramalina menziesii in California: Coastal vs. Inland Populations
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Abstract

The fruticose lichen Ramalina menziesii varies morphologically across its range in central, coastal California: The thallus is thin and filamentous near the ocean, net-like and coarser inland. We used a nondestructive sampling technique to estimate seasonal and annual linear growth of the inland form transplanted within an inland site and to a coastal site. Growth at the inland site was concentrated in the fall and winter months when precipitation occurred; growth at the coastal site was nearly constant through the first year of the study. Ramalina menziesii from the inland site grew significantly faster at the coast (38.7%/yr.) than inland (20.1%/yr.). Lichen from both sites was transplanted both within and between sites and biomass increase was measured destructively after 1 yr. Both morphs grew equally within the same site, and more rapidly at the coastal site. Annual growth rates were lower when estimated as biomass: Approximately 14%/yr. inland and 24%/yr. at the coast. Some genetic differences appeared to exist between morphological types, but their growth responses to the environment were plastic.

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