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Buddhism, Religion, and the Concept of "God"

Ilkka Pyysiäinen
Numen
Vol. 50, No. 2 (2003), pp. 147-171
Published by: Brill
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3270517
Page Count: 25
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Buddhism, Religion, and the Concept of "God"
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Abstract

It is here argued that, although the Buddha and the buddhas are not regarded as gods by Buddhists, they clearly fulfill the criteria of "counter-intuitive agents" as they have been presented by Pascal Boyer. To the extent that religion can be understood as human thought, action, and experience that involve counter-intuitive representations, Buddhism does not have to be the problematic touchstone for a global concept of religion.

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