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Employee Voice, Human Resource Practices, and Quit Rates: Evidence from the Telecommunications Industry

Rosemary Batt, Alexander J. S. Colvin and Jeffrey Keefe
ILR Review
Vol. 55, No. 4 (Jul., 2002), pp. 573-594
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
DOI: 10.2307/3270623
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3270623
Page Count: 22
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Employee Voice, Human Resource Practices, and Quit Rates: Evidence from the Telecommunications Industry
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Abstract

The authors draw on strategic human resource and industrial relations theories to identify the sets of employee voice mechanisms and human resource practices that are likely to predict firm-level quit rates, then empirically evaluate the predictive power of these variables using data from a 1998 establishment-level survey in the telecommunications industry. With respect to alternative voice mechanisms, they find that union representation predicts lower quit rates, even after they control for compensation and a wide range of other human resource practices that may be affected by collective bargaining. Also predicting lower quit rates is employee participation in offline problem-solving groups and in self-directed teams. No apparent association is found between quit rates and the availability of nonunion dispute resolution procedures. Regarding human resource practices, higher relative wages and internal promotion policies predict lower quit rates, and contingent staffing, electronic monitoring, and variable pay predict higher rates.

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