Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Localization of mRNA for Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor and a Cholesterol Synthetic Enzyme in Rabbit Nervous System by in situ Hybridization

Larry W. Swanson, Donna M. Simmons, Sandra L. Hofmann, Joseph L. Goldstein and Michael S. Brown
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 85, No. 24 (Dec. 15, 1988), pp. 9821-9825
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/32730
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Localization of mRNA for Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor and a Cholesterol Synthetic Enzyme in Rabbit Nervous System by in situ Hybridization
Preview not available

Abstract

The low density lipoprotein receptor and one of its ligands, apoprotein E, are known to be synthesized in the central nervous system. In the current study, we used in situ hybridization to localize the receptor mRNA in selected neurons and glia throughout the nervous system of 9-day-old rabbits. Particularly high levels were found in sensory ganglia, sensory nuclei, and motor-related nuclei. The same regions contained high levels of mRNA for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase, a regulated enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. The distribution of low density lipoprotein receptor mRNA was similar in mature and immature rabbits. The data suggest that certain cells in the nervous system have high requirements for cholesterol, which they satisfy through cholesterol synthesis and through receptor-mediated uptake of cholesterol-carrying lipoproteins. The latter originate in astrocytes which synthesize and secrete apoprotein E. These data suggest that the nervous system of mammals contains an active system for continuous redistribution and recycling of cholesterol that is physically distinct from the lipoprotein transport system in plasma.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
9821
    9821
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9822
    9822
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9823
    9823
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9824
    9824
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9825
    9825