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Changes Associated with Parasitism in Nematodes. I. Morphology and Physiology of Preparasitic and Parasitic Larvae of Meloidogyne javanica

Alan F. Bird
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 53, No. 4 (Aug., 1967), pp. 768-776
DOI: 10.2307/3276768
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3276768
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Changes Associated with Parasitism in Nematodes. I. Morphology and Physiology of Preparasitic and Parasitic Larvae of Meloidogyne javanica
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Abstract

Both morphological and physiological changes associated with the onset of the parasitic mode of life were observed in living second-stage larvae of a plant-parasitic nematode. These changes which take place as the preparasitic or infective larvae of Meloidogyne javanica becomes parasitic in the root of its host were observed in living anesthetized larvae under the phase-contrast microscope at high magnification. Changes in the mobility and infectivity of these larvae during the same periods were also measured. There is an accumulation of granules in the ducts of the subventral esophageal glands shortly before hatching. These granules appear to be associated with penetration both of the eggshell and the plant cell wall and disappear completely within 1 to 3 days of entry into the host. Within this period of time there is an approximate threefold enlargement of the dorsal and subventral esophageal glands. At the same time there is a progressive loss in the ability of the larva to reinfect its host and to move through the soil.

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