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A New Species of Dipetalonema from the California Sea Lion and a Report of Microfilariae from a Steller Sea Lion (Nematoda: Filarioidea)

Mary Lou Perry
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 53, No. 5 (Oct., 1967), pp. 1076-1081
DOI: 10.2307/3276843
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3276843
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A New Species of Dipetalonema from the California Sea Lion and a Report of Microfilariae from a Steller Sea Lion (Nematoda: Filarioidea)
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Abstract

Dipetalonema odendhali sp. n., Family Onchocercidae, is described from the California sea lion (Zalophus c. californianus). Adult worms were found in the intermuscular fascia of four hosts, and in additional sites-but not the heart-in one of them. Formalinized blood of one host contained microfilariae which are described. Conspecific filarioid parasitism among the California and Steller sea lions, northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus), harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), and northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) is considered. The demonstration of unidentified microfilariae in formalinized blood of a Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubata) establishes a new host record for filarioid nematodes. A critical review of the literature indicates that there is a lack of documentary evidence of the existence of an enzootic infection with Dirofilaria immitis in the California sea lion, or, indeed, in native California domestic dogs. Microfilariae were examined in stained blood films of a captive California sea lion. The R-cell pattern was different from that of microfilariae of D. immitis.

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