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Haemaphysalis (H.) obesa Larrousse (Ixodoidea: Ixodidae) from Northeast India and Southeast Asia: Description of Immature Stages and Biological Observations

Harry Hoogstraal, Yutaka Saito, Vijai Dhanda and H. R. Bhat
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 57, No. 1 (Feb., 1971), pp. 177-184
DOI: 10.2307/3277776
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3277776
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Haemaphysalis (H.) obesa Larrousse (Ixodoidea: Ixodidae) from Northeast India and Southeast Asia: Description of Immature Stages and Biological Observations
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Abstract

The larva and nymph of Haemaphysalis (H.) obesa Larrousse, described here, are quite similar to those of the Javan H. (H.) hirsuta Hoogstraal, Trapido, and Kohls. The two species comprise a structurally specialized and biologically similar H. (H.) obesa group. H. (H.) obesa inhabits dense, humid lowland forests from West Bengal and Assam (India) in the west, through Thailand southwestward into Perlis (the northernmost state of Malaysia) and northeastward into the Republic of Vietnam. Known hosts of adults are medium and large-size forest-dwelling mammals, the monkey, bear, boar, deer, and domestic cattle, and probably the elephant. The single nymph recovered from a host was biting on the neck of a child. Adults, nymphs, and larvae were swept or picked from forest vegetation; they rest on the underside near the tips of leaves within 1.5 m from the ground. In laboratories in India and Thailand, the life cycle was completed in about 100-130 days. The obesa group presents several unique and numerous interesting areas for structural, functional, ecological, biological, and epidemiological research.

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