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Haemaphysalis (Kaiseriana) anomala Warburton (Ixodoidea: Ixodidae) from India: Description of Immature Stages and Biological Observations

Harry Hoogstraal, Vijai Dhanda and H. R. Bhat
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 58, No. 3 (Jun., 1972), pp. 605-610
DOI: 10.2307/3278216
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3278216
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Haemaphysalis (Kaiseriana) anomala Warburton (Ixodoidea: Ixodidae) from India: Description of Immature Stages and Biological Observations
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Abstract

The immature stages of Haemaphysalis (Kaiseriana) anomala Warburton are described and characterized in relation to those of other species of the H. (K.) cornigera group. The previous single records of adults in widely scattered localities from Ceylon, Northeast India, and Southeast Asia are now expanded by relatively numerous data for adults, nymphs, and larvae from moist deciduous forests between 800 and 3,400 ft altitude in western Himalayan foothills and valleys of Uttar Pradesh and Himachal Pradesh. The temperature range in these forests is from 40 C in summer to 1 C, or rarely slightly less, in winter, and much of the total annual rain (125 to 300 cm) falls during the monsoons. Most adult ticks were taken during the monsoons; all immatures were collected in premonsoon and postmonsoon months. Nymphs and larvae were found feeding on a coucal, Centropus s. sinensis (Stephens) (Cuculidae), and rats (Rattus spp.). Adults were common on domestic cattle and buffalo. In the laboratory, the three-host type of life cycle was completed in about 4 months.

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