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Histopathology Associated with Endoparasitic Helminths in Bass

Gerald W. Esch and William J. Huffines
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 59, No. 2 (Apr., 1973), pp. 306-313
DOI: 10.2307/3278822
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3278822
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Histopathology Associated with Endoparasitic Helminths in Bass
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Abstract

Histopathologic changes in the smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui), induced by parasitic helminths, were evaluated. Tissues studied were from liver, gonads, ceca, intestine, and spleen. These were removed from bass categorized by age, sex, and size, and according to season of the year. In the intestine and ceca, most damage (mucosal erosion, fibrosis, and chronic inflammation) was induced by the acanthocephalan Leptorhynchoides thecatus. The extent of the structural damage was mostly related to number of parasites present. In the spleen, liver, and gonads, severe pathological changes were associated with the migration of the plerocercoid of Proteocephalus ambloplitis. Cellular response of bass to enteric and parenteric parasites always included increases in numbers of globular, eosinophilic leukocytes. In no case was parasite-induced sterility apparent. In this regard, younger and smaller male bass exhibited more severe and more extensive structural debasement of the gonads than males of other size and age classes and than females of any size or age group. This was not due so much to worm burden as it was to the size of the gonad in relation to the size of the plerocercoids.

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