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Journal Article

Survival of Protoscolices of Echinococcus granulosus at Constant Temperatures

Ferron L. Andersen and Raymond M. Loveless
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 64, No. 1 (Feb., 1978), pp. 78-82
DOI: 10.2307/3279612
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3279612
Page Count: 5

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Topics: Protoscoleces, Cysts, Hydatids, Liver, Lungs, Echinococcosis, Sheep, Zoology, Animals, Viability
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Survival of Protoscolices of Echinococcus granulosus at Constant Temperatures
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Abstract

A study was conducted to determine the effects of storage at constant temperatures upon the survival of protoscolices of Echinococcus granulosus from hydatid cysts removed from infected sheep. Parallel tests were conducted on intact cysts from both lung and liver, and on protoscolices stored within 1-ml samples of hydatid fluid. The longest survival times of any of the samples tested at each temperature were: -20 C, 1 hr; -10 C, 4 hr; 1 C, 16 days; 10 C, 16 days; 20 C, 8 days; 30 C, 4 days; 40 C, 2 days, and 50 C, 2 hr. In general, protoscolices survived considerably better when stored within intact cysts than when in 1 ml of hydatid fluid. At temperature ranges where putrefaction occurred, protoscolices in cysts from lung survived longer than those from liver. The ability of these protoscolices to survive extended periods of time after an infected sheep has died or been killed suggests that stringent preventive and control measures should be established in areas where hydatid disease is endemic. Animal pits at community dumping grounds where sheep carcasses might be discarded should be enclosed or covered, and all stray and roving dogs in those regions should be rigidly controlled.

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