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White-Tailed Deer Utilization of Three Different Habitats and Its Influence on Lone Star Tick Populations

Carl D. Patrick and Jakie A. Hair
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 64, No. 6 (Dec., 1978), pp. 1100-1106
DOI: 10.2307/3279735
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3279735
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
White-Tailed Deer Utilization of Three Different Habitats and Its Influence on Lone Star Tick Populations
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Abstract

Deer-use patterns as determined by pellet-group counts on sample plots in 3 different habitats in Oklahoma during 1973 and 1974 did not differ statistically, but biological trends were apparent. The meadow habitat received greatest deer-use in the early spring and the upland oak-hickory most during the summer of both years of the study. Abundance of Amblyomma americanum (L.) was highest in the upland oak-hickory habitat and lowest in the meadow habitat whereas the bottom oak-hickory habitat supported an intermediate population. The meadow received considerable deer-use; however, it did not support a significant tick population because of unfavorable ecological conditions. The bottom oak-hickory habitat had low deer-use but was second in tick abundance because microclimatic conditions there were the most favorable of the 3 habitats and allowed greater tick survival. The upland oak-hickory habitat reflected heavy deer-use through tick abundance but its climatic conditions were not as ideal for tick survival as those in the bottom oak-hickory habitat.

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