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Development, Survival, and Oviposition of the Rabbit Tick, Haemaphysalis leporispalustris (Packard) (Acari: Ixodidae), at Constant Temperatures

A. Campbell and M. V. Glines
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 65, No. 5 (Oct., 1979), pp. 777-781
DOI: 10.2307/3280361
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3280361
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Development, Survival, and Oviposition of the Rabbit Tick, Haemaphysalis leporispalustris (Packard) (Acari: Ixodidae), at Constant Temperatures
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Abstract

The relationship between development, survival, and oviposition rates, and five constant temperatures is described for the developing and reproductive life stages of the rabbit tick, Haemaphysalis leporispalustris (Packard). Development was most rapid at 29.7 C for egg and larvae, and 35.6 C for nymphs. Survival was greatest between 14.7 and 29.7 C, but was reduced at 35.6 C for eggs and larvae. Oviposition was optimal between 19.9 and 29.7 C with a maximum mean daily oviposition of 253 eggs/female/day on the third day of oviposition at 29.7 C. Maximum mean total eggs per female produced was 1,157 with a range of 277 to 3,327. The total number of eggs produced per female correlated with the weight of the engorged female. Both linear and sigmoid curve equations were used to approximate the relationship between the temperature and development rates of eggs, larvae, and nymphs. The nymphs had the highest heat requirements of the 3 development stages. Comparisons with field host-parasite data indicate that the rabbit tick has a 2-yr life cycle in southwestern Nova Scotia.

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