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Haemaphysalis (Garnhamphysalis) mjoebergi: Identity, Structural Variation and Biosystematic Implications, Deer Hosts, and Distribution in Borneo and Sumatra (Ixodoidea: Ixodidae)

Harry Hoogstraal and Hilda Y. Wassef
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 68, No. 1 (Feb., 1982), pp. 138-144
DOI: 10.2307/3281337
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3281337
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Haemaphysalis (Garnhamphysalis) mjoebergi: Identity, Structural Variation and Biosystematic Implications, Deer Hosts, and Distribution in Borneo and Sumatra (Ixodoidea: Ixodidae)
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Abstract

Haemaphysalis (Garnhamphysalis) mjoebergi Warburton was reported from four male specimens from Sarawak, Borneo. We redescribe herein the male, from three specimens from Sarawak and 24 from Lampung District, Sumatra, and describe the female from 24 specimens from Lampung. Male structural variation in the dental formula and development of the coxa IV spur and segments of legs III and IV is unusual or unique in the genus Haemaphysalis. "Atypical" males might easily be misidentified. This species provides an ideal model for experimental study of population genetics and evolutionary processes and of biological factors influencing body size and structural variation in the genus Haemaphysalis. The sambar deer, Cervus unicolor brookei Hose (Sarawak) and C. unicolor equinus Cuvier (Sumatra), appears to be the chief host in humid, marshy, lowland forests and secondary growth. Single collections were from a human and a domestic cow. The dynamics and vector potential of this tick should be investigated in environments being exploited for human settlement and cattle breeding.

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